Posts Tagged ‘festival marketing’

In the frame with Brian Griffin

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Brian Griffin Format Photography Festival Commission

Normally used to leading on the creative front, a few of the Katapult team earlier this week became the subjects for a new commission by internationally renowned photographer Brian Griffin.

Brian Griffin, coined “photographer of the decade” by The Guardian, came to take pictures of Dawn and the team for his new commission for the 2013 Format International Photography Festival, launching in March next year.

Brian recently launched “The Road to 2012″ for the National Portrait Gallery, producing portraits of some key figures involved in the bid for London 2012 and responsible for delivering the Olympic Park infrastructure. The project aims to showcase a lasting legacy of the London 2012 Olympics Games.

Being passionate about photography and having been involved with the branding and marketing for Format for the last five years, we were proud to be asked to be part of Brian’s new commission due to be exhibited in Derby next year. After a thoughtful recce around our building, judging lighting conditions and use of space in each room, Brian finally decided on a location for the piece. Without preconceptions of how he would construct the image, Brian’s imagination and eye for detail in instructing us how to move or where to stand demonstrated amazing creative and technical prowess, which wowed us all. We’re looking forward to seeing the chosen image and displaying it here in the building for all to see in the new year.

Unfortunately we can’t release the background to the commission; the project will remain closely under-wraps until further details are released by Format Photography Festival in the press later this year.

NB: There are now only three days left for all photographers, artists, curators and collectives to upload their work to the Format Exposure submissions site; the theme this year being ‘Factory’.

Proposed cuts to arts and culture could threaten future business investment in Derby

Friday, October 28th, 2011

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I speak for us all at Katapult when I say that we were shocked and hugely disappointed to read that Derby City Council are proposing to make drastic cuts to arts and culture in our city. The plans show the intention to completely withdraw funding to two of the city’s key venues, QUAD and Deda over the next four years. Alongside other cuts to cultural and community organisations, this sends out a very concerning message about our city, its ambitions and its future.

The ‘Revenue Budget Proposal’ acknowledges that these venues will now need to source alternative funding and/or become self financing. These organisations were never supposed to be solely commercial venues and would never have received Arts Council Funding if that were the case.

The 2009-2011 Cultural Strategy for Derby ‘Action Plan’ outlined its vision in ‘ensuring that the importance of culture in the economy of the city is better understood’, which is now just one of many points which seems contradictory.

Culturally incredible progress has been achieved in Derby in recent years. Format has been internationally recognised as a leading photography festival and Derby Feste, founded by Keith Jeffrey (QUAD) and Stephen Munn (Deda) attracted over 25,000 people to the streets of Derby last month. This demonstrates the potential for cultural activities and their associated opportunities.

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As well as the social impact, businesses in the supply chain to these venues will be directly affected. QUAD spent £377k with local suppliers in 2010/11, ironically this is more than Derby City Council invested in the venue. Between them, QUAD and Deda have generated millions of pounds worth of international profile for the city, helping to attract new investment. Drastic cuts not only devalue these organisations and their impact, but demonstrate a lack of understanding over the social and economic benefits that culture plays in the development of the city.

It’s certainly important to Katapult, which is why we have invested in and supported cultural activities in the city. A strong cultural offer is key to attracting and retaining creative professionals which is important to our business.

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A city to invest in?

The cuts raise a wider discussion on the future of Derby’s city centre. We know that Derby is home to some strong and established businesses that provide the economic backbone of the city and we hear great things about the city’s industrial strength. However, every top-drawer city has more to offer than industrial heritage.

By further developing the cultural offering – more independent bars, shops and restaurants for example – we could increase footfall, encourage localised spending and help attract new business to the city. It is only through long term commitment and investment that success will be achieved.

The Council states that it expects to make a loss in rental income from Derby’s indoor markets of £210,000 in 2012/2013 and a review of markets will take place to understand the pressures faced. This provides a perfect opportunity for the Council to work proactively with independent and creative retailers on finding a potential solution to these pressures.  The aim should be to produce a more attractive retail offer in line with the type of markets found in nearby cities such as Leeds and Birmingham.

Reports such as the Centre for Cities ‘Shifting the Gears’ claim that Derby must reach out beyond its borders and its traditional industrial base to grow. Shouldn’t now be the time that the city looks to further invest in the creative and cultural industries: the third fastest growing sector in the UK?

The short-sightedness of the council makes businesses like ours concerned about the future of our city.  Culture is a vital aspect of an aspirational city, not just a nice-to-have.

Here’s how you can make your voice heard and support the ‘Save Derby Arts and Culture’ campaign:

1)      Get informed about Derby City Council’s specific plans by looking at the budget proposal
2)      Fill in the feedback form. The section relating to arts and culture cuts is under the ‘Neighbourhoods’ section. You have until Friday 18 November to do this.
3)      Send your stories in a polite email to Derby City Council leader Philip Hickson and deputy leader Hilary Jones.
4)      Share your stories on the Facebook page Save Derby Arts and follow the campaign on Twitter @SaveDerbyArts
5)      Write to the Derby Telegraph with your stories and ask the editor Steve Hall and entertainment editor Nigel Powlson to run a campaign.
6)      Support the organisations affected by the proposed cuts by going to their events and exhibitions, eating and drinking in their cafes and bars and taking part in their participatory projects.

Author: Dawn Foote, Managing Director

Format International Photography Festival in Derby, Right Here Right Now

Monday, March 21st, 2011

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Photography by Graham Lucas Commons ©

This year’s Format International Photography Festival launched at the beginning of March and runs until 3 April, in over 30 venues all over Derby city centre.

The title this year is Right Here, Right Now: Exposures From the Public Realm, the theme being contemporary street photography from all over the world. The line up is stronger and already more popular than ever with contemporary street photographers such as Alex Webb and Polly Braden, Joel Meyerowitz and Bruce Gilden. Many of the photographers will also be hosting talks, conferences and master classes across the city.

The Katapult team attended the opening night which was packed full and had a great buzz which was made even more colourful with the opening speeches from Brian Griffin and Joel Meyerowitz. Thanks was also provided to all those behind the festival and in particular Louise Clements who is the festival’s co-founder and curator. Dawn from Katapult attended the Format conference on the 5th March at QUAD, and said it was great to hear about the various projects and speak to practising street photographers from around the globe, covering subjects from a geo tagging project, social media experiments and the work of individuals such as Bruce Gilden. One of her highlights was hearing from John Maloof and the work of Vivian Maier.

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Photography by Graham Lucas Commons ©

For the second time, Katapult have created the Mob FORMAT submissions process – an international mass submission online project in association with Flickr. The website functionality enables photographers to submit their work and pay for their submissions online. The administration of the site enables the FORMAT judges to view submitted entries and shortlist them independently online. The final shortlist will then be judged by a panel of industry experts. The best images will be selected by a high profile jury & special guests and shown in the premium section of the site. Selected images will be exhibited in an evolving exhibition throughout the festival on the BBC Big Screen in Derby Market Place, and on mobile screens around the city.

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Alongside the FORMAT11 website and Mob FORMAT submissions portal, Katapult designed the marketing materials for the festival such as banner stands, flyers and posters, roundabout and roadside posters, window vinyls, teardrop flags, press adverts and then produced the VIP launch invites and the official Format Festival guide which featured full event listings and a detailed map featuring the locations of all the Format venues.

So far there have already been well over 8,000 submissions to the Mob FORMAT area of the site from all over the world, a 300%  increase compared to FORMAT09.

The FORMAT team have told us that they are well on target to achieve 100,000 visitors to the festival this year, a 25% increase in the corresponding figure for FORMAT09.

Have a look at the Sky Arts at Format Photography video documentary: Sky Arts at Format Photography

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Photography by Graham Lucas Commons ©

KATAPULT + FORMAT

It was Derby’s reputation for Photography that played a significant role as to how and why Katapult was formed and is located in the city today; two of Katapult’s founding director’s came  here to study at the University of Derby back in 1998 due its reputation for Photography degrees.

Katapult have been working with FORMAT International Photography Festival since 2007. For FORMAT09 – Photocinema, Katapult worked closely with the FORMAT team to develop the  marketing campaign, festival materials and website. We also did significant development work on MOB FORMAT which integrated flickr with a flash gallery within the site to increase  international engagement and participation in the festival.